Volume Buyers

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7 ways you don’t want to enable buyers to abuse you

Fred Ashforth, sales coordinator at Titan Homes, found this article and was sharing it with his co-workers. The article was then brought to my attention by my sales rep, Ron Major, at our Open House last weekend.  I discussed it with my team this morning at my sales meeting. I thought I would share it with all of you! Have a great weekend!

From Close the Deal: Smart Moves for Selling by Sam Deep and Lyle Sussman©2000

 

  1. Don’t give buyers free consulting.

Yes, buys should get all the information they need to make an informed buying decision. They shouldn’t, however, “pick your brain” or let you serve as an unpaid consultant. You can help buyers discover that you can help them solve their problem. Don’t show them how until they become customers.

 

  1. Don’t prepare detailed, costly proposals without assurance that the proposal will receive serious consideration.

Buyers should receive a written proposal if they ask for one. Some buyers ask for one after a decision has been made, just to get multiple bids. Don’t play the game. Get a guarantee that the proposal will be reviewed fairly.

 

  1. Don’t allow you and your proposal to travel up and down the buyer’s organizational hierarchy.

In your up-front contract, clarify the buyer’s decision-making process. Get an agreement that each presentation you make will be followed by a mutually agreed upon action by the buyer. Stick to your position.

 

  1. Don’t tolerate open-ended indecisiveness.

If buyers think you’ll hang around indefinitely, they are in no hurry to make a decision. Extract an up-front agreement on some length of the buying cycle. If time starts to drag, impose the limit.

 

  1. Don’t let your products or services be demeaned.

Some buyers will minimize what you do and what you sell. If you allow that to pass without a challenge, you’re reinforcing the notion that you’re just another salesperson with a product no better than anyone else’s. If you don’t show respect for your product, and company, who will?

 

  1. Don’t let your company or coworkers be demeaned.

Be open and candid in accepting responsibility for past failures. At the same time stand up for the integrity, competence and commitment of your team. Buyers who demean your people to your face are saying even more to others behind your back. Be sure they have the facts about any situation s they claim to have knowledge of. Defend the honor of the good people who work in your company. Your loyalty will not be lost on buyers.

 

  1. Don’t enable buyers to put you in ethical or legal dilemmas.

Should you bend over backwards to get a sale? Certainly. Should you marshal all the resources at your disposal to make the buyer happy? You bet. But don’t ever let that mean that you compromise your integrity or sell your soul.

 

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April 15, 2016 - Posted by | General Information, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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